Media Figures Supporting Science

Over at Slate, Phil Plait has an article on promoting media figures that support science. In particular, he discusses his decision to retweet a picture highlighting some famous Hollywood actresses who have shown some interest or aptitude in science. The controversy here is over the question of who should be applauded or treated as a role model for their interest or work in science and related fields.

The picture in question highlights five actresses with a variety of connections to science, from inventing new technologies to writing children’s books about math and science. Plait notes that the most controversial choice in the picture is the inclusion of Mayim Bialik, who earned a PhD in neuroscience. It’s not her actual work in earning the PhD that is controversial (as far as I know – I’ve never even taken a neuroscience class), but rather it is her apparent connections to various fringe groups pushing alternative medicine and anti-vaccination beliefs. Plait decided that Bialik’s work using her celebrity status to popularize science is more important the negative effects of her support for pseudoscience.

I would actually take the opposite position on this. The purpose of the image seems to be to highlight some celebrities who can also be seen as role models for children (and girls in particular) who might be interested in science. It shows that even cool people like science. However, in the case of Mayim Bialik, her support for pseudoscience and bad medical practices has far outweighed her scientific achievements in the eyes of the public (she has a PhD but doesn’t appear to have done any research since graduating). It’s difficult to hold her up as a role model when she’s setting back public support of science in other fields. While the idea of the image discussed in the article is fine, I think it would have been much better to showcase five people who have done real work (beyond student research/work) in science or popularizing science and who aren’t associated with anti-scientific groups. It really shouldn’t be that difficult to find five such people, although if it is difficult to do so then that might be a more interesting topic to talk about.

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