Study: Don’t Trust Medical Advice You Get From TV

A study published earlier this week on fact-checking medical claims made on TV has been popping up all over the internet for the past few days. The authors watched a number of episodes of two different medical talk shows, compiled a list of various recommendations and then tried to find evidence supporting these recommendations. This is a pretty qualitative way to study this, but sounds like a reasonable way to fact check these programs. A well-supported medical claim ought to be easy to find in the literature. Claims that can’t be found in a short search through the literature probably lack enough evidence to make a serious recommendation.

The article makes Dr. Oz’s show look particularly bad (and Dr. Oz’s credibility has already suffered a number of blows this year). Less than half of the 80 recommendations from his show included in the study were found to have any serious supporting evidence. Furthermore, it was rather shocking to see that Dr. Oz’s show mostly gives dietary advice (over 1/3 of recommendations) or recommends “alternative therapies.” This suggests that Dr. Oz is really just telling viewers what they want to hear and not what they need to hear. The other show, The Doctors, wasn’t great either but seemed to have a much more balanced mix of recommendations and also did a far better job at suggesting that people consult their actual doctors rather than just blindly following what they saw on TV.

Having prominent shows with millions of viewers peddling quack medicine is very bad for all science fields and not just medicine. Medicine is probably the closest most people get to actual science, so when unsupported recommendations don’t work they could lead to eroding the public’s trust in science. Furthermore, medical professionals have a duty not to mislead the public. This paper suggests that prominent public figures in medicine are failing at one of their most basic duties.

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